7 Responses

  1. sketch
    sketch at |

    skeered me there for a moment… I have always thought of ingress as IN-bound traffic as a way to keep them straight… that second paragraph threw me off a bit… thank goodness for pichures.

    Reply
  2. Mike
    Mike at |

    Hi Chris,

    Another great article!

    Reply
  3. mark
    mark at |

    hi
    i have 10 vps in my server

    so how limit bandwidth for several vps

    ex:3 vps 500gb bandwidth and 5 vps 3000gb and 2 vps 300gb

    Reply
  4. Anders O
    Anders O at |

    This is an interesting point, but how about the NIOC shares configuration?

    If the VMs on the test host were trying to generate network traffic, wouldn’t the NIOC shares make sure they got their fair share of bandwidth?

    Reply
  5. goslackware
    goslackware at |

    I agree that the paragraph about ingress and egress through me off as well, as the article is defining it from the network nodes perspective instead of the vSwitch perspective, which is unusual.

    Ingress frames, layer 2 of OSI model, from the perspective of the vSwitch, is inbound traffic that a VM, ESXi host vmk, or other device on the network has sent to it.

    Egress frames, layer 2 of OSI model, from the perspective of the vSwitch, is outbound traffic that is to be sent to a VM, ESXi host vmk, or other device on the network.

    Reply

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